Practical Learning and Study Abroad

This originally appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of Portraits magazine

Saint Anselm Students and Faculty at Macchu PicchuStudy abroad is one of the kinds of practical learning emphasized in Saint Anselm’s new five-year strategic plan, “Looking Within – Reaching Beyond.” Students have studied at universities and colleges in countries as diverse as Russia,

South Africa and Egypt, and the college has offered faculty-led courses in China, France and Italy. In January, students will study in Vietnam with Matthew Masur, associate professor of history. Nationally, the number of students studying abroad has quadrupled in the past two decades—to about 15 out of every 100 students in a bachelor’s degree program.

As a result, by the time they apply for their first jobs after college, many students have international experience that prepares them for roles in globally connected businesses, political settings, and other fields. Increasing study abroad opportunities for Saint Anselm students reflects two of the main directives in the college’s strategic plan, “Looking Within – Reaching Beyond:” Creating educational distinction and developing ethical leaders for a global society. Students on the Peru trip spent time in the ancient city of Cuzco and in Machu Picchu. Students who  studied tropical biology in Belize learned about two incredibly diverse ecosystems—the tropical rainforest and coral reefs of Belize.

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  • Ashley Lafond

    Love this! I'm spreading the blog and visiting R. Lowell soon.

  • mgcronin

    Haircuts are scary for me, too, but I almost never take a can of Guinness with me. I hope you toasted Lowell with it, as follows:

    :Wherever there's grass, there
    is pollen,

    the asthma of high
    summer—

    the inclination to drink, not
    eat . . ."

  • Cheryl Ruffing

    What an interesting little foray into your own backyard. Since picking up a camera on a daily basis, I've visited a fair number of graveyards. They are fascinating places. While I've read poetry on the tombstones, I have not yet stumbled upon any tombstones of poets.

    I have a collection of Lowell's poems, but thus far, they haven't spoken to me. I also own a copy of Paul Mariani's biography of the poet, purchased after meeting and interviewing Paul and his lovely wife, Eileen, for "The Denver Catholic Register." One of these days, after the math, science, history, religion, art and other literature I share with my kids on a fairly regular basis, I'll turn to Lowell.