Food, Clothing & Furniture Drive Wants Your Stuff!

Students and Abbot Matthew, O.S.B. carry couch

For the eleventh year, 41 Saint Anselm College students will spend the second half of final exams and a few days thereafter collecting, organizing, and distributing items to deserving families in the area. As of May 1, boxes were placed in Residential Life Halls to collect unwanted, gently-used items from students. Beginning on Wednesday, May 10, the drive will start collecting larger items – mainly couches and furniture – through the last day of final exams, Friday May 12th.

Students and Abbot Matthew, O.S.B. carry couch

Clothes, toys, furniture, books, household goods, and other gently-used items in good, clean condition are gratefully accepted for distribution to families in Manchester and surrounding communities. Last year, the Drive was able to offer 90 families assistance. This year, the goal of the drive is to service 100 families.

Amy Vachon '17, a member of the committee is ready to get started with this year’s work. “I am confident that this year we will reach our goal of serving even more families,” she says. “I cannot wait to lift some couches alongside some of the most amazing people I have met at this college.”

FCF is a student run program organized by a committee of six members, three seniors, Carroll BaileyCourtney Puccio, and Vachon, and three juniors, Georgie RooneyJoey Smith, and Madison Vigneault. Overseen by the Dean of Students Office, FCF also benefits from the support of the Alumni Office, Advancement Office, Student Government Association, Dining Services, Physical Plant, Saint Anselm alumni, and more.

Student-organizers have been intentional in their efforts to incorporate the Benedictine values of the college into the drive. “We are able to preserve the dignity of our fellow neighbors and create a better and stronger neighborhood,” says Bailey. “FCF brings awareness to the close proximity of large social issues happening right around us. By being able to engage with our neighbors in the Manchester area, we become aware of simple ways we can become more engaged in our community.”

To donate, smaller items can be placed in the boxes in residence halls and apartments around campus. Pick-up times should be scheduled with the FCF crew for donations of larger items such as couches and televisions. Pick-ups can be arranged by emailing fcf@anselm.edu.

10th Annual "Sr. Pauline Relay For Life" Looks To Set New Record

Relay for Life of Saint Anselm College

The Saint Anselm College community will gather for a spring ritual, the tenth-annual Sr. Pauline Lucier Relay For Life, in the Carr Center on Friday, April 7. The all-night American Cancer Society fundraiser begins at 6 p.m., and continues through 4 a.m. on Saturday, April 8. Saint Anselm College's service societies have set a goal of $100,000 for this year's event, following a record-breaking collection of $96,000 in 2016.

Relay for Life of Saint Anselm CollegeMore than 900 registered participants had collected more than $70,000 by Wednesday morning.

Robert "Bob" Shea, Director of the Dana Center will serve as Grand Marshall in the parade of survivors, and will address the assembled participants during the 6 o'clock hour. Participants will then commence the 10-hour relay, ensuring members of the community are taking laps around the Carr Center throughout the night.

Energy and enthusiasm will be supplemented throughout the event with activities including musical chairs, tug-of-war, limbo, and more. The "Pantene Beautiful Lengths" hair donation hour invites Anselmians to donate 8 inches of hair towards the creation of wigs for cancer patients, and has quickly become a favorite – and memorable – portion of the evening.

The Saint Anselm Relay for Life is named in honor of Sr. Pauline Lucier, C.S.C., a former Campus Minister at the college who passed away in May 2009. At the 2008 walk, Sr. Pauline served as the Grand Marshal. The event was named in her memory the following year.

Anselmians "Walk A Mile," Raising Awareness About Assault, Violence

Walk A Mile event, November 2015

The College's Assault and Violence Education and Reporting Team (AVERT) encouraged members of the college community to "walk a mile in their shoes" on Friday, November 6. The second-annual event encouraged students, including athletic teams and members of college societies, as well as faculty, staff and administrators, to walk around the Carr Center wearing opposite gender footwear, in a show of support for increased understanding and commitment to ending domestic violence and sexual assault.

Matthew Sargent '18 with Dean of Students Alicia Finn and Abbot Matthew, O.S.B.The walk concluded 'Enough is Enough' week. The campaign is part of a nation-wide effort to promote safe environments in schools and on college campuses. "We hope to reinforce the message that any act of violence is unacceptable in the very places our nation’s students should expect the greatest peace and security in order to be successful in their academic pursuits," said Joe Horton, Vice President for Student Affairs. "Members of the Saint Anselm College community have put together an impressive slate of events for our campus campaign, including several exhibits that draw attention to issues related to violence. This has been an effort of strong collaboration and excellent work by all involved."

AVERT is co-chaired by Pat Shuster (Vice President for Administration and Title IX Coordinator) and Alicia Finn (Dean of Students). The group is tasked with providing ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns related to sexual assault on campus.

Abbey Players Open Family Weekend With "A Hawk's Life"

"A Hawk's Life" Family Weekend Show 2015

Lights, camera, action! It is that time of year for the annual Family Weekend Show, “A Hawk’s Life.” This weekend, the Anselmian Abbey Players will perform this student-run show about life at Saint Anselm.

"A Hawk's Life" Family Weekend Show 2015The Family Weekend show, featuring 43 students, is a sequence of nine vignettes about the experiences of college life. “A Hawk’s Life” follows the year of a freshman as he experiences events such as orientation, roommate conflicts, the gingerbread competition, finals, senior graduation, and leaving for the summer.

Photo Gallery: "A Hawk's Life"


Students auditioned during the second week of September and have been practicing four days a week, three hours a day since. However, without the leadership and guidance of the show’s creative team, this would not have been possible. The creative team includes Kaity Beaumont ’16 (writer; director), Ginger Gates ’17 (music director) Marialena Bazzano ’16 (choreographer), Katie Corbett ’16 (producer, choreographer), and Morgan Turnbull ’17 (producer).

The writing of “A Hawk’s Life” began back in the spring semester of last year. Kaity Beaumont created the plot and major events for the show around re-written Saint A’s oriented song lyrics. She chose a creative team for running the show and presented her script to the Abbey Players, having it selected at the end of April.

The show includes traditional Broadway, Disney, pop, and rock songs. Beaumont tried to select songs and events that are relative to a wide audience in order to connect with both students and parents.

“I chose to incorporate things that everyone goes through in college, and also things specific to Saint A’s. I wanted to include snippet of life here to show how unique and special our school is and paint an accurate picture of college life,” says Beaumont.

One of the scenes included is the annual gingerbread competition, featuring an all boys musical number. The sequence shows the boys arguing over what to make for the competition through the popular Backstreet Boys’ song “I Want it that Way.”

Over the summer, Beaumont sent multiple drafts of the script to her team and the process has been ongoing. Ginger Gates reviewed the songs chosen for the show and began recruitment for the student pit band. Meanwhile, Marialena Bazzano and Katie Corbett began the choreography; each creating four dances independently while collaborating on the opening number.

“[I] had to keep in mind that everyone’s dancing levels were different, as they varied from experienced to beginner,” said Corbett.

“But I believe that the choreography for the show is able to showcase everyone and their talents, as well as be simple enough that everyone, regardless of their dancing skills, would be able to enjoy.”

Besides co-choreographing the show, Corbett, along with Morgan Turnbull, serves as co-producers for the production. Both of them are in charge of communicating with the cast when it comes to detailing out weekly rehearsal schedules as well as keeping track of the progress of the show. Furthermore, as stage managers, they make sure the scenes will run smoothly.

Although putting on the show takes a lot of time and effort, it is worth the hard work. Beaumont expressed, “The experience has been so wonderful! It has been a lot to juggle, but every second has been worth it. It is surreal to see something that you created come to fruition.”

Corbett adds, “I have enjoyed watching the show itself grow into an amazing production.”

The Abbey Players will perform two productions of “A Hawk’s Life”: Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. and Oct. 24 at 2 p.m. in the Dana Center. Tickets are $8.

Saint Anselm Community Travels to Philadelphia to See Pope Francis

Saint Anselm students at Papal Mass

At three-thirty on the dot on the morning of September 27, 2015, 54 students, faculty, and staff boarded a double decker bus in pursuit of the Holy Father of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope Francis. The short trip, spanning only 24 hours, resembled a modern day pilgrimage: the participants sacrificed sleep, routine, and a normal weekend for a chance to gain a glimpse of the Pope.

Last week, Sept. 21-25, the Saint Anselm College community watched as Pope Francis traveled from Washington D.C., to New York City, N.Y., to Philadelphia, Penn. The main event on Sunday, Sept. 27, on the last leg of the visit, was a Mass for the Family, focused on the aspect of the modern, varied family, celebrated by the Holy Father himself.

Saint Anselm students at Papal MassThe 4 p.m. Mass was scheduled a mere 12 hours after the participants left Saint Anselm College. The group arrived in Philadelphia, Penn. at noon, parked, and made their way into the center of the city. When they finally reached The Benjamin Franklin Parkway, where they hoped to be able to enter the inner crowd closest to the Pope, they found the area unfortunately already full.

However, even from far away, the group was able to celebrate the beauty of the Mass. A few blocks away, they were still within earshot of the echo of the speakers and the incredible choir.

Director of Campus Ministry, Susan Gabert described the experience of Mass saying, “Just being at a Mass led by our shepherd the Holy Father, with 1.5 million others – singing hymns, praying the our father, exchanging the sign of peace. It was so moving. Such a tangible example of the universality of our Catholic Church.”

Participant Kayla Patten ’17 said, “Holding hands while singing the “Our Father’ was one of the most moving experiences of the entire trip.”

The Pope’s homily proclaimed by the modern day Prophet, focused on themes of community and love. As Gabert explained, “He said ‘Holiness is always tied to small gestures…love shown by little things.’” She continued, “He called us to action of love in our homes, in our society, asking ‘what kind of world do we want to leave for our children?’”

While many predicted that the Holy Father would focus on heated issues, he chose to expound on the message of the coming Year of Mercy, which will focus on the idea that "No one can be excluded from God's mercy."

Participants connected their experience to the Pope’s message. “We were able to take this opportunity to recognize ourselves and others together as part of God's family, seeing one another not as strangers, but as sons and daughters of Christ, made in His image,” said Jenny Richard ’17.

Many, including Campus Minister Andrew Fellows commented that this Pope makes him very proud to be a Catholic.

“If you ask me, going to see the Pope is definitely a once in a lifetime experience,” said freshman Braelyn Croteau, who hoped this opportunity would help her connect with God another way.

“He is the closest path to God, and praying with him will only strengthen my prayer. I am humbled that I was in his presence.”

The trip was sponsored by the generosity of the college chapter of the Knights of Columbus.

This amazing opportunity is truly an example of our Patron, Saint Anselm’s eternal message of “faith seeking understanding.” This opportunity to live out the Benedictine tradition of the Catholic Faith is priceless to our own Anselmians but to all who were able to attend.

Women's Rugby Battles for National 7's Championship

Saint Anselm College women's rugby

The Saint Anselm College Women’s Rugby Team is traveling to West Point, New York to challenge for the American Collegiate Rugby Association’s National 7’s Championship. The eight-team tournament is being held at the United States Military Academy May 2-3.

Saint Anselm College women's rugbyLed by senior captains Haley Mount and Brooke Judd, Saint Anselm is looking to capitalize on its successful Spring 7’s campaign.

Sixteen members of the forty member squad have been selected to travel and compete. Despite losing key members Kaitlyn Fisher and Elisha Griffin to injury, the women boast an experienced squad that includes All-Conference players including seniors Elizabeth Duffy and Basirat Sanni; as well as sophomores Taylor Bergstrom and Mary “Frankie” Mullen.

In order to qualify for the national tournament, the team participated in their regional tournament hosted by Stonehill College, on April 11. There, the Hawks remained undefeated throughout, until dropping a close, hard fought championship match to Stonehill.

Thanks to an impressive tournament performance that caught the attention of the Selection Committee, Saint Anselm was invited to join the “Field of Eight.”

The Women will play three matches on Saturday. The schedule has Saint Anselm in Pool Play facing Davenport University at 10 a.m., Stony Brook University at 12:40 p.m., and Bloomsburg University at 3 p.m. Sunday matches will be determined based on Pool Play results.

The tournament can be viewed via livestream on YouTube. Saint Anselm College vs. Stony Brook University will be shown live at 12:40 p.m.

Saint Anselm Senior Nursing Majors Receive Nurse's Pin

Senior nursing students process into the Abbey Church

Today was a special day for 83 senior nursing majors as they received their Saint Anselm nurse’s pin in the 2014 pinning ceremony in the Abbey Church.

A tradition dating back to 1860, the pinning ceremony is a proud moment for student nurses as they are welcomed into the nursing profession. It is a celebration of the student’s completion, symbolizing their preparedness to serve as a compassionate caregiver.

Senior nursing students process into the Abbey Church

“The pinning ceremony presents you with the mark of your school, so all will know that you have become part of the proud nursing alumni at Saint Anselm College,” said Dr. Sharon George, dean of nursing.

“Today we want to honor you for choosing this challenging and rewarding profession and for the difference you will make in the lives of your patients.”

Senior Alexandra Lagoutis of Orange, Conn., was chosen to represent her class as the student speaker.

Lagoutis said she was honored and excited to have the opportunity to speak at the event.

“The tradition of pinning is a beautiful way to bridge the role of student to professional, and to be reminded of the significance of our education and the unique and meaningful impact it will have on both our practice and our lives,” says Lagoutis.

In her remarks, she urged her fellow nursing students to remember what it means to be a Saint Anselm nurse.

“Our practice will be propelled by compassion; by the willingness to channel Florence Nightingale and create an environment of healing,” she said.

“To challenge, to question, to research; to think holistically, to advocate, to care, and to comfort; to hold hands, and share Popsicles. From this day forward, we are not just nurses, we are Saint Anselm nurses.”

The nurses' pins were then blessed by Father Augustine Kelly, O.S.B., and presented to each graduating senior by Dr. George and several nursing faculty: Professors Karen Grafton, Ann Fournier, and Margaret Walker.

The pin, proudly worn by all Saint Anselm nursing graduates, features elements of the college seal and the symbol of a lamp referring to Psalm 119:105, “Your word is a lamp of my steps and a light for my path.”

The student nurses then took the Nightingale Pledge, an oath to honor and respect their patients and profession.

Following the ceremony, Father Anselm Smedile, O.S.B., celebrated Mass.

Full Remarks


Dr. Sharon George, Dean of Nursing

"The nursing pin has been both literally and symbolically a cross to bear, a medal and a badge. Nursing is a cross to bear for those of us who remain with the patient long after others have given up hope and gone home. Nurses never forget about their patients even when they are not caring for them physically, they remain in their thoughts, remembering always that they are caring for someone's mother, father, sister, brother, son or daughter, and that these people are counting on them to do for their loved one what they themselves cannot do."

Alexandra Lagoutis '14, Student speaker

"As nursing students, we spend countless hours working. There are late nights, early mornings, papers, projects, and exams. Lectures can be long and exhausting, clinical can be an overwhelming whirlwind of rules, regulations, and a game of where on the unit is your instructor. But then, there are moments that we have making it all worth it. Patients that smile and say thank you. Patients that tell you you’re going to make a great nurse one day."

Program: Student Acknowledgments & Faculty Reflections


Spring Sports Make Debut

Saint Anselm men's lacrosse practice

The Saint Anselm Hawks are kicking it into high gear as baseball, softball, men's and women's tennis, and men’s and women’s lacrosse have officially begun their spring seasons.

Already two games in, men’s lacrosse plays their first home game on March 19 at 4 p.m. against Molloy. The team was voted into seventh place for the 2014 Northeast-10 Men's Lacrosse Preseason Coaches' Poll by the NE-10 in February. They return with all of their top-five leading scorers from last season.

Saint Anselm men's lacrosse practiceSoftball just wrapped up a spring training trip to Clermont, Fla., where junior pitcher Tayla Trask (Lincoln, Maine) pitched a complete-game shutout for the second straight day, helping the team to a 6-4 record for preseason. The team plays their first game of the season on March 22 at Pace. The NE-10 Conference Coaches poll placed Saint Anselm fourth in the 2014 Northeast-10.

Women’s lacrosse started strong with their first 3-0 record in seven years after beating Nyack College 22-4 at home on Saturday. The Hawks were picked to finish fifth in the Northeast-10 in the Preseason Coaches' Poll announced in February.

Saint Anselm baseball also started their season on a positive note as they swept a pair of games at Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla. Men’s baseball will face a number of competitive teams in the upcoming month including St. Thomas Aquinas and Lemoyne. Their first home game is March 26 against Franklin Pierce.

The hawks tennis programs continue with spring play after a winter break. The men's and women's tennis teams opened their season against Merrimack in February. The women's next home match is March 26 against Franklin Pierce University while the men's team hosts Endicott College on March 19.

Check out Saint Anselm athletics for full stats and news »

 

 

Hawks Beat SNHU in Nationally Televised Basketball Game

Saint Anselm beats SNHU in nationally televised basketball game

It was a great day to be a Hawk today as the Saint Anselm men’s basketball team beat cross-town rival Southern New Hampshire University 83-75 in front of 1,000 fans in Saint Anselm College's Stoutenburgh Gymnasium and a national television audience.

Saint Anselm College beat SNHU in nationally televised basketball gameThe game, aired live on CBS Sports Network, was Hawks’ coach Keith Dickson’s 525th win and helped the team improve to a 14-6 season, winning seven of their last nine games.

It was a game to remember played in front of a sold-out crowd including more than 450 Saint Anselm students as well as Saint Anselm trustees, alumni, faculty, staff, monks, and friends of the college.

Led into the stands by the college’s Hawk mascot, students were decked in super fan t-shirts and face paint and kept the gym rowdy. Senior, psychology major and volleyball player Vivian Fitzgerald joined by fellow senior, politics major Guy Sergei kept the crowd energized with cheers and chants.

“It was a great game,” said Fitzgerald. “The energy in the gym was contagious and the boys brought their A-game.”

Saint Anselm athletic director Jo-Ann Nester was ecstatic about the high attendance and number of student-athletes involved including the entire field hockey team who assisted with ticketing and refreshments.

Alumnus Dave Cuzzi, class of 1996, was only one of more than 300 alumni who attended the game to support his alma mater.

“It was a lot of fun to see the game and all the students and their school spirit,” said Cuzzi.

The game also brought together friends from the classes of 1969, 1968 and 1962 as well as some Saint Anselm basketball greats who returned to campus for the special game.

Even Arthur Cummings from the class of 1953 returned to get in on the action. Particularly though, Cummings wanted to see senior point guard Dino Mallios play. Cummings has known the Mallios family for years, having taught Mrs. Elaine Mallios, Dino’s mother, in high school. The former teacher and principal of Winthrop High School in Winthrop, Mass., has recommended Saint Anselm to many a high school-er through the years.

“He’s a legend in the community,” said Mrs. Mallios.

In addition, alumni and Anselmians all over the country rooted for their Hawks from watch parties in Boston, Hartford, Long Island, and Manchester.

The Hawks return to action at home on Saturday, Feb. 15 at 3:30 p.m. when they play host to Franklin Pierce University at Stoutenburgh.

Read more of the game highlights »

Game Day Photos


History Professor Reflects on Martin Luther King, Jr.

History Professor Andrew Moore

As the country celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., history Professor Andrew Moore reflects on King’s impact then and now, 46 years later. In the Q&A below, Moore gives historical context to the movement King led, discussing the question of equality, King’s affect on the civil rights acts, and how we can continue to honor his legacy.

Moore, an expert in religion, race and gender relationships post-Civil Rights era, is currently teaching a course on “Contemporary America,” which explores the political, social, and cultural movements since 1945.

History Professor Andrew Moore discusses Martin Luther King, Jr. Q: Why is Martin Luther King, Jr. still relevant in today’s society?

Andy Moore (AM): Americans have always wanted to believe that ours is a country where every one is equal. It makes us unique. King was able to highlight that this talk about equality was just talk. There was not equality. He was able to articulate that reality in a way that got people’s attention.

He’s relevant still because he represents the two different sides of the American idea of equality – equal opportunity and equal outcomes.

On the one hand, the mainstream civil rights movement wanted an end to legal segregation. That is, they wanted the law not to restrict people based on race. The speech that everyone knows at least part of is an example of this. King had a dream that his children would be judged “not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” A lot of people latch on to that quotation and claim that King stood for equal opportunity – and that’s very American. We all expect this equal opportunity. At the very least, the law should be color blind. King and the civil rights movement achieved this, when Congress passed the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

On the other hand, if we look at King’s entire career – especially the few short years after the Voting Rights Act – we hear him saying that equal opportunity (or equality before the law) was not enough. That did not go far enough to achieve actual equality in real life circumstances.  When he was assassinated, he was pushing for an economic version of the Civil Rights Act.  In his Poor People’s Campaign, there was a broader focus on equality—on equal outcomes—so he was arguing that everyone was still not starting from the same place.

He’s still, then, relevant because the question of equality is still an open question.

Q: What about now? How was he successful?

AM: It depends on which side you look at. People who believe in equal opportunity would say we’re on the path moving forward to a color blind society, that legally and culturally there is less awareness of race as a dividing factor. The other side says race is still a dividing factor, there is persistent inequality. They point to economic, education, employment, and crime statistics and say there is not equal opportunity; race still does matter.  There is ample evidence to support both positions.

Q: How do we continue to honor King? 

AM: First, as a historian I think one should learn as much about King’s life and the civil rights movement as possible.  That way we can better understand how the issues King was concerned about are still relevant. For example, we would better understand last year’s Supreme Court decision striking down part of the Voting Rights Act. We could then vote or pressure congressmen in an informed way.

Second, no matter which side of the question of equality we come down on, King and the civil rights movement provide a model for political activity that was effective. Grassroots organizing plus a principled moral stance is a formula for being an engaged citizen. So one could honor King by organizing and pressing for political and moral reform in a way that is always respectful of one’s opponent.

Q: What are the social and political implications of Barack Obama as our first African American President? How has that affected perspectives on race in this country?

AM: I think this is not a straightforward answer – again, there’s something for everyone. People who point to equal opportunity say, ‘hey we elected an African American president. There’s change.’ At the same time, President Obama has not talked about race a lot, but when he has, he has done so in a way that presidents since Lyndon B. Johnson have not. He’s been able to address continued racial inequality and cultural perceptions of race.  He’s been able to articulate the continuing relevance of racial issues in a way others have not.

Q: How are you reviewing Martin Luther King Jr. in your Contemporary America course this spring?

AM: The students will read some speeches by him, and they will learn in general about the civil rights movement. They’ll also read the book, “Coming of Age in Mississippi” by Anne Moody. This was published in 1968. Moody was an African American woman who was active in the civil rights movement but – like other black students and young people who came of age in the late 1950s and early 1960s – was critical of King and other leaders, saying they were not radical enough, they compromised too quickly. She represented a popular sentiment of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) that thought King wasn’t willing enough to be arrested and spend time in jail or spend enough time at local demonstrations.

King was the movement’s national leader. Without his insistence on non-violence and his political skills, the movement probably would not have been as successful as it was when it was. So this book also lets me highlight the tension between grassroots activists and King – with the understanding that the movement was successful because of a powerful combination of King’s national leadership and grassroots activism.

Also, Moody wrote just a couple of years after the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act had been passed by Congress. Still, she ends the book on her way to the 1963 March on Washington. When someone asks her whether the movement song, “We Shall Overcome,” was true (i.e., whether they truly would overcome), she responded,“I wonder. I really wonder.”  She was not hopeful that simply changing the law would accomplish true equality.

Professor Moore is also an expert in the history of the American presidency and presidential politics.