2017 Fall Club Sports Update

WomensRugby

Saint Anselm’s club sports teams are student-run organizations that enable students to participate in competitive intercollegiate games while enhancing member’s social and educational experience on the Hilltop. Clubs that are recognized by the Student Government Association (SGA) are overseen by the SGA Secretary of Club Affairs with advisement from the Office of Student Activities and Leadership Programs.

Clubs offer a venue for students seeking to supplement their academic experience at Saint Anselm with athletic achievements. Hawks form lasting bonds with their teammates while enjoying one or more of many creative physical outlets suited to their individual athletic interests. In addition to fostering a sense of community, club sports provide students with the opportunity to gain valuable leadership skills.

We spoke with five of the fall semester’s active club teams, and highlight their seasons here.

ClubHockey

Club Hockey (Men’s)

Club Hockey most recently hosted University of Massachusetts Lowell, recording a 5-4 victory in an overtime thriller. The win brings the Hawks to a 7-1 record on the season, firmly entrenching their hold on the top position in the NECHA American Conference Northeast division. With 13 games left in a regular season that stretches into February, there will be plenty of opportunities for fans to watch playoff-hopeful Hawks club hockey.

The Hawks upcoming features include two home bouts against Boston College and Bentley University this weekend (November 4 at 4:30 p.m. and November 5 at 5 p.m., respectively). Next weekend the club will host the University of Vermont and the University of Maine.

The men’s team is led by President and Captain Samuel Buran. He is assisted by co-captains Thomas Royer (the club’s vice president) and Michael Doyle. There are 28 players on the club roster.

Club Hockey (Women’s)

Women’s Club Hockey has 22 skaters on their official roster, headed by co-captains and co-presidents MaKayla Sterling and Marisa Gervasi. They will finish off their 2017 campaign with a busy slate of home matchups against various DI and DII colleges and universities.

On November 5, the Hawks will host the University of New Hampshire in a Sunday afternoon tilt in Sullivan Ice Arena at 2 p.m. After the Wildcats come to town, the Hawks will finish their final home games against the University of Vermont, Dartmouth College, and Westfield State before hosting Boston College on November 19 at 2 p.m. to wrap up the regular season.

WomensRugby

Club Rugby (Women’s)

Women’s Club Rugby is concluding a great fall campaign. Led by President Jacqueline Glendye, Vice-President Emily Lowe, and captains Sarah McAndrews and Morgan Brady, the Hawks have battled numerous colleges, including Stonehill and Roger Williams College.

The 28 members will have one more home game this season at 12 p.m. on November 4 against Providence College. Glendye encourages anyone who is interested in rugby to attend, as “new members are always welcome throughout the season and the school year.”

Club Soccer (Women’s)

Under the direction of fifth-year coach Chad Burroughs, women’s Club Soccer turned their nine games this season into a 3-2-4 record. Alongside President Samantha O’Neil, club Captains Meghan James, Kayla Wilson, and Erin Connelly lead the 26 members of the squad. The team finished their season at home against Brandeis University, recording a tie in the contest.

Next spring, the club will host an exhibition tournament and a free soccer clinic for local children. By providing an opportunity for Manchester youth to learn how to play soccer, the club hopes to actively engage with the community while promoting their sport as a fun and healthy outside activity.

Club Ultimate (Co-Ed)

Under the new leadership of President Randy Jack, Club Ultimate continues to be one of the most popular options for students seeking fun athletic competition. With an official roster of 38 members, the co-ed club provides an engaging opportunity for participants to learn the fundamentals of the sport while bonding as a team and competing in numerous intercollegiate events.

Captained by Madeline Dunn, Margaret McNeil, Zachary Demas, and Gregory Williams, Club Ultimate is concluding a busy fall semester with multiple tournaments, including an October 28 matchup against the Panthers of Plymouth State University. The club will host a tournament on November 11, so be sure to check out the action and support the Hawks.

Other clubs teams that compete during the fall semester include Men’s Rugby, Golf, and Men’s Soccer.

 

Zoos, Music, and WWII: A Sample of 2015 Fall Courses

BI 335: Animal Behavior

Visiting the zoo, learning to play a new instrument, and reading texts about Nazi Germany are a sample of what students are doing at the start of the 2015-2016 school year. Animal Behavior, Reading Seminar: Nazi Germany, and Studies in Music Performance are three courses that are bound to give students an interesting and fun Fall Semester.

BI 335: Animal Behavior

This course offers an introduction to basic animal behaviors and the mechanisms that drive them. Taught by Professor Lori LaPlante, the course lectures cover an array of topics ranging from evolution to neurobiology, genetics, and territoriality.

A unique and major component of the class is a semester-long zoo project at the Stone Zoo. For the project, each student has to complete an observational study on an animal of his or her choice.

The study requires students to develop a research hypothesis, collect observational data, analyze the data, and draw conclusions about his/her animal. According to LaPlante, students have chosen an array of unique and exotic animals including flamingoes, snow leopards, reindeer, and tamarins.

Biology and Psychology major Courtney Russell ’16 chose to take the class last year because she originally wanted to become a veterinarian. For her animal study, she observed the vigilant versus day-to-day behaviors of Cotton Top Tamarins, an endangered species. Although difficult, she was able to support her hypothesis that vigilance occurs more frequently in the wild than in captivity.

She feels that the lectures and project was very beneficial and also helped valuable writing experience needed for other classes.

“I greatly enjoyed having Professor LaPlante as a teacher and taking this class. The information presented was very interesting and presented in a way that was easy to remember,” said Russell.

“I would definitely suggest this class to students majoring in Biology and Psychology as well as anyone interested in animal behavior.”

HI 489: Reading Seminar: Nazi Germany

For many majors, seniors are required to write a Research Thesis in order to finish their degree requirements. However, the History Department offers senior History majors two choices: a Research Seminar or Reading Seminar.

The difference between the two courses is that the Research Seminar allows students to develop, research, and write on a topic of their choosing. On the other hand, the Reading Seminar analyzes and discusses works on an area of historical study as a class. This fall, Department Chair Phil Pajakowski chose a Reading Seminar related to Nazi Germany.

“Nazi Germany is a good subject for such a seminar because this period in German history has attracted enormous interest and study among historians, and has given rise to great questions of interpretation,” Pajakowski states.

“Nazism evokes evaluation of the ways historians come to grips with a difficult subject.”

Unlike most history majors, Kristen Van Uden (’16) is taking both Seminar courses. However, her interest in both World War II and her thesis topic did not deter her from pursuing them.

She explains, “I have always been fascinated by the Holocaust. Taking the World War II class with Professor Hugh Dubrulle last year definitely sparked my interest. I am not afraid of the work so I thought I would take a class that interested me, and related to my thesis.

Throughout the course, students will be reading and discussing a variety of books including Henry Turner’s Hitler’s Thirty Days Power: January 1933, Timothy Ryback’s Hitler’s First Victims: The Quest for Justice, Christopher Browning’s Ordinary Men, Robert Gellately’s Backing Hitler, and Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf.

MU 160: Studies in Music Performance

After offering music lessons for credit in piano and flute last fall, the Fine Arts Department is expanding its program. This semester, students will be able to take lessons in violin, organ, and voice.

Over the summer, the Department hired four part-time faculty members to teach lessons—Liesl Schoenberger Doty (violin), Eric Bermani (organ), Emily Jaworski (voice), and Nick Pothier (piano).

Liesl Schoenberger Doty explains how expanding the music department has been great for students. She says, “It is so great to be offering lessons to students. They are able to take lessons and creatively improve their musical voice. It is the core of what it means to be interested in and play music.”

Students have also found much excitement about the program expansion. “I did concert choir while in high school and have not been able to continue training during college. So I am ecstatic to be doing voice lessons this semester,” says senior voice student Alanna Tremblay.

“Even though I’ve only had two lessons so far, they have already been helpful for noticing what I have to work on as a performer.”

Tremblay also revealed how these new classes will prove beneficial to the college. “Having the opportunity to offer music classes raises the standards of the college. Saint Anselm has expanded their expectations on what a liberal arts college is all about.”

Alongside the new lessons, Professor Sean Parr is also teaching senior Fine Arts majors Billy Endicott and Emily Barrett an Independent Study course in Conducting.

Parr hopes that these new additions will have a positive impact on the Fine Arts Department. He says, “ Hopefully, these chamber ensembles will continue to gain momentum. We’re hoping that the growing interest in music performance at the college will lead to the founding of a new Chamber Orchestra for credit and perhaps even a Band.”

Adding to the individual lessons, Professor Parr has established a new choir for credit—the Chamber Singers. The group, consisting of sixteen students, will be singing a mix of secular and sacred classical music as well as Holiday songs. The singers will be presenting several outreach performances and will perform in a concert at the end of the semester.